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In the Netherlands you might take a walk or go on a bike ride.In Germany, couples don't start with formal dating either and it's only after a series of informal meetings – walks, dinner, cinema, theatre – that they might start being seen as a ‘couple'.

Of course, every relationship is different and how yours develops will depend on who you both are and the chemistry between you.

If you like each other, you'll probably find a way to make it work, regardless of any cultural variations.

Flip-flops, shorts or scruffy clothes in general tend not to make a good impression in fashion-conscious Europe. In France, a man may be late but don't take it personally – French men are notoriously bad timekeepers.

In Germany and Switzerland, however, punctuality is highly valued so if one of you rolls up late, your date will be off to a bad start.

If you say ‘no' to an invitation, he may well think you're playing hard to get and will probably persist.

If you really aren't interested, then be very clear and tell him politely but firmly (the hints that might work back home, won't work here).French and Spanish men may seem a little OTT, showering a woman with compliments. It doesn't mean he's (necessarily) a creep, as paying a compliment is a form of acknowledgement rather than flattery in those countries.In places like the Netherlands and Germany, people can be very direct in the way they speak (rather than being over polite and saying things ‘to be nice' that they don't mean to avoid hurting someone's feelings – as is often the way in the UK).But knowing some of the cultural differences – who makes the first move, kissing on a first date, how soon to call after a date – may help you avoid awkward situations, or at least stop you from getting hurt or hurting someone else unintentionally.In Europe, getting to know someone romantically is fairly laid back.Here's a guide to take you through your first Euro date.

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