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group and the candidate laboratories turned into a P. However, in a 1990 paper Gove conceded that the "arguments often raised, …

that discarding the blind-test method would expose the results – whatever they may be – to suspicion of unreliability.

Shredding the samples would not solve the problem, while making it much more difficult and wasteful to clean the samples properly.

Colonetti', Turin, "confirmed that the results of the three laboratories were mutually compatible, and that, on the evidence submitted, none of the mean results was questionable." Although the quality of the radiocarbon testing itself is unquestioned, criticisms have been raised regarding the choice of the sample taken for testing, with suggestions that the sample may represent a medieval repair fragment rather than the image-bearing cloth.

It is hypothesised that the sampled area was a medieval repair which was conducted by "invisible reweaving".

The development in the 1970s of new techniques for radio-carbon dating, which required much lower quantities of source material, prompted the Catholic Church to found the Shroud of Turin Research Project (S. Also present were Cardinal Ballestrero, four priests, archdiocese spokesperson Luigi Gonella, photographers, a camera operator, Michael Tite of the British Museum, and the labs' representatives.

group initially planned to conduct a range of different studies on the cloth, including radio-carbon dating. The six labs that showed interest in performing the procedure fell into two categories, according to the method they utilised: In 1982, the S. The blind-test method was abandoned because the distinctive three-to-one herringbone twill weave of the shroud could not be matched in the controls, and a laboratory could thus identify the shroud sample.

In a well-attended press conference on October 13, Cardinal Ballestrero announced the official results, i.e.

that radio-carbon testing dated the shroud to a date of 1260-1390 CE, with 95% confidence.

The other half was cut into three segments, and packaged for the labs in a separate room by Dr Tite and the archbishop.

The lab representatives were not present at this packaging process, in accordance with the protocol.

An outer strip showing coloured filaments of uncertain origin was discarded.

The remaining sample, measuring 81 mm × 16 mm (3.19 in × 0.63 in) and weighing 300 mg, was first divided in two equal parts, one of which was preserved in a sealed container, in the custody of the Vatican, in case of future need.

The labs were also each given three control samples (one more than originally intended), that were: and communicated their results to the British Museum.

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